Yōji Yamamoto

Considered a master tailor alongside those such as Madeleine Vionnet, he is known for his avant-garde tailoring featuring Japanese design aesthetics.

is a

Japanese
fashion
designer
DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE YAMAMOTO STYLE
The main and first concept of Yamamoto's clothing is to protect the female body from male eyes and cold wind. The androgynous style of the collections shifts the focus from the body to the face. According to Youji, the face is the source of sexuality.
Black color
“Black is both modest and noble. Relaxed and comfortable and mysterious at the same time. But most of all, black is a message to others: I do not bother you, and you do not bother me."
Ⓕunctionality
Yamamoto's clothes are transformed thanks to layering and many pockets, zippers, and headbands. In addition, most models are only available in one universal size.
"The more a woman hides her sexuality with clothes, the more sⓔxuality appears in her eyes".
Clothes from Yamamoto are often closed, loose fit, in contrast to the tight "canon" of modern fashion.

The designer's clothing has been compared to that of a peasant, nomad, or beggar. This is facilitated by both loose fit and rough fabrics without ornaments.
Любимый цвет Ямамото - черный.
The Yamamoto brand became widespread both in Japan and abroad in the 80s of the twentieth century.
Clothes from Yamamoto are often closed, loose fit, in contrast to the tight "canon" of modern fashion.

The designer's clothing has been compared to that of a peasant, nomad, or beggar. This is facilitated by both loose fit and rough fabrics without ornaments.
Favorite color is black.
The Yamamoto brand became widespread both in Japan and abroad in the 80s of the twentieth century.
Clothes from Yamamoto are often closed, loose fit, in contrast to the tight "canon" of modern fashion.

The designer's clothing has been compared to that of a peasant, nomad, or beggar. This is facilitated by both loose fit and rough fabrics without ornaments.
Любимый цвет Ямамото - черный.
The Yamamoto brand became widespread both in Japan and abroad in the 80s of the twentieth century.
Favorite color is black.
Yohji Yamamoto
Yohji Yamamoto
In 1945, his father died at the front, causing the boy’s mother to wear a black mourning color for the rest of her life. In addition, when Yohji was only two years old, there were nuclear explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

These events had a big impact on the designer’s future: black and chaotic asymmetry will be the leitmotif of his collections.
was born in Tokyo in at the height of World War II
In 1945, his father died at the front, causing the boy’s mother to wear a black mourning color for the rest of her life. In addition, when Yohji was only two years old, there were nuclear explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

These events had a big impact on the designer’s future: black and chaotic asymmetry will be the leitmotif of his collections.
was born in Tokyo in at the height of World War II
bombing of Hiroshima





bombing of Hiroshima





"When I think of my father, I understand that the war is still raging inside me."
Yamamoto was raised up by his mother, who was a self-employed clothier working in a post-war Japan.
A dressmaker by trade, Yumi suffered what Yamamoto recalls as the indignities of a highly skilled worker whose gender and station in life afforded her little opportunity to make a rewarding living or to obtain recognition for her talents.

Yumi encouraged her son to become an attorney-he graduated with a law degree from Keio University but never practiced. The lure of becoming a designer, however, pulled Yamamoto into fashion.
Yamamoto didn’t immediately choose a career as a designer. It was only after graduating from Keio University Law School at Tokyo that he entered the famous Bunka Gakuen Fashion School in Japan.

Three years after graduating from the School, Yamamoto created his own clothing brand, and in 1977 he showed his first prêt-à-porter collection in Tokyo.
where Issei Miyake and Kenzo Takada studied
For the next few years, he worked from the back of his mother’s boutique and in 1977 launched his debut collection, Y’s, in Tokyo.
guarding and hiding a woman's body. I wanted to protect the woman's body from something – maybe from men's eyes or a cold wind."
guarding and hiding
It meant something to me
DESIGNING coats for women.
"I jumped on the idea of
– the idea of a coat
A WOMAN'S BODY."
His career as a professional designer started in 1981 from Paris. In an interview with New York Times during 1983, the designer expressed his idea of dressing women in men’s clothing. His wanted to design men’s coats for women so their body stays hidden and guarded from cold wind or men’s sight.

He is constantly exploring the connection between the feminine and masculine, and creates clothes for women with an intellectual or artistic bent.
“I think perfection is ugly. I want to see scars, setbacks, mess, distortion."
In 1984, Yamamoto presented for the first time in Paris a men’s collection with a traditional aesthetic: asymmetrical sleeves, collarless shirts.

Not everyone could appreciate the shocking design: even in Japan people dressed in this brand were called “crows”. It was in the 1980s that Yohji Yamamoto became a clothing brand for a narrow circle of people.
Yohji Yamamoto didn’t limit himself to designing everyday clothes. In the 1990s and 2000s, he created costumes for many theatrical productions and films. The designer worked on the design of classical operas: “Madame Butterfly” (Lyon, 1990) and “Tristan and Isolde” (1993, Beirut).
In the future, he will create concert costumes for the Placebo band and for films by Japanese director Takeshi Kitano.
Youji begins to create perfumes under his own brand. The designer named the first perfume after himself - YOHJI.
One of the best fashion presentations in recent memory was the spring 1999 collection that Yamamoto created around the theme of a wedding.
Rather than disrobing, as is usually the case in fashion shows, the mannequin, dressed in an unadorned hoop-skirted wedding gown, pulled her mantle, a pair of sandals, a hat, gloves, and finally, a bouquet of flowers from pockets hidden in the gown.
The collection was the high point of his career.





He reasoned ...
“Behind the wedding dress there must be many stories”
In 2001, Yamamoto surprised many fashion critics – together with Adidas he launched the Y-3 line. The collection was a huge commercial success. Yamamoto announced that his collaboration with Adidas was one of the first “bridges” between sport and fashion.
The designer was convinced that in this way high fashion could influence the street culture and make it more aesthetic.
Yamamoto publishes his autobiography
His biography is a stream of vivid flashbacks, thoughts, short poems, poems, proverbs and the results of his 30-year career.
in fact, a man who may turn heartless in an instant; I desire only to settle each and every score immediately.”
It was foolish to expect Youji to tell the story in chronological order.
Victoria
Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum in London hosted an exhibition on the history of the brand.
Explored 40 years of Yohji's work by his friends:
German director
Japanese director
Wilhelm Ernst
Takeshi Kitano
French architect
Jean Nouvel
Hollywood actress
Tessa Charlotte Rampling
Rizzoli New York publishes the book "Yamamoto and Youji".
Explored 40 years of Yohji's work by his friends:
GERMAN DIRECTOR
JAPANESE DIRECTOR
WILHELM ERNST
TAKESHI KITANO
FRENCH ARCHITECT
JEAN NOUVEL
HOLLYWOOD ACTRESS
TESSA CHARLOTTE RAMPLING
Rizzoli New York publishes the book "Yamamoto and Youji".

Yohji Yamamoto "Dressmaker" is an intimate and delving portrait of one of fashion’s most revered stalwarts.
Premiere / June 12, 2016
An intimate portrait of of Yohji Yamamoto, one of the most influential and enigmatic fashion designers of the last forty years.

The film sets out to discover and uncover the many layers of the man, delving into the fascinatingly complex life story of this iconic and visionary 73 year-old Japanese craftsman.


DresⓈmaker
It wouldn’t be an exaggeration if anyone says that Yamamoto is among the most prominent Asian designers. The designer likes to be called a "dressmaker" instead of a fashion designer. He has always been fascinated by the relationship between Western couture and Japanese customs.
It wouldn’t be an exaggeration if anyone says that Yamamoto is among the most prominent Asian designers. The designer likes to be called a "dressmaker" instead of a fashion designer. He has always been fascinated by the relationship between Western couture and Japanese customs.
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